Friday, February 17, 2017

High 5 Weekly Career Transitions Roundup: 15 Things You Can Do to Be Happier at Work

This is our weekly roundup of some of the best career-related articles, interviews, blogs, etc., we've read during the week. We share them so you have some great resources to prepare you for the coming week. Enjoy!

  • 15 Things You Can Do to Be Happier at Work: "Many will just put up with the situation until they decide it’s time to quit. But proactive careerists can use proven methods to improve their situation and grow into their role, ultimately becoming happier at work."
  • 5 Brain Hacks to Boost Your Motivation: "Focusing on the bigger goal gives you the feeling of working on something greater and being part of something bigger than yourself. It gives deeper meaning to the objective you seek."
  • Brand Yourself for Career Stability: "Your unique way of getting things done makes a difference in the world. Capture this feedback and use it to market yourself."

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Making the Most of a Professional Conference

So, you have a professional conference coming up and you want to use the time and experience more productively. Here are a few tips to make the most of your upcoming professional conference.

1. Engage online prior to the conference. Many conferences start online groups on Facebook or Twitter for attendees to start the conversation early. Be sure to join and get engaged. You might want to pose a few questions, such as asking for advice for a first-time attendee or finding out what sessions or topics others are most interested in.

2. Identify 3-5 individuals you want to meet and schedule meetings in advance. Look over the schedule and the featured speakers and identify a few you'd like to meet. Likely you can find their contact information easily with a simple search. Send a brief message letting the person know what you'd like to discuss with an offer to buy a coffee or drink. Most people are generous and you can count on several of these forays to result in a meeting.

3. Narrow your focus and plan to attend fewer sessions than you want to attend. You can usually find session after session that sounds interesting and valuable but you might want to consider planning to attend fewer than you think at first glance. You'll want to save time for those sessions that go long, provoke spontaneous conversations among attendees, or offer you an opportunity to talk with one of the presenters.

4. Schedule time to rest and recharge. You'll be at your best and enjoy the conference more if you schedule regular time to rest, get away from the crowds, and recharge.

5. Follow the people you meet on social and mention or retweet them. In addition to collecting business cards be sure to follow the people you meet on their social media, such as Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram, and share or retweet information they put out there.

6. Send a brief message of thanks and follow-up with your new contacts within a week of the conference. Once you get home and get resettled you'll want to send a note of thanks to those you meet and invite them to connect with you on your social media channels.

These are just a few of the steps you can take to get the most out of your upcoming professional conference.

Monday, February 13, 2017

Daily Leap Career Video of the Week: How to Use LinkedIn, Twitter and Snapchat in Your Next Job Search

Each week we present our Daily Leap Career Video of the Week. The video we share presents news or advice related to career and life development, searching for a job, the economy and employment, and other career-related topics.

In the video below from EntrepreneurJessica Abo speaks with digital expert and entrepreneur Courtney Spritzer about using LinkedIn, Twitter, and Snapchat in your job search.

Friday, February 10, 2017

High 5 Weekly Career Transitions Roundup: 5 Techniques to Increase Your Motivation

This is our weekly roundup of some of the best career-related articles, interviews, blogs, etc., we've read during the week. We share them so you have some great resources to prepare you for the coming week. Enjoy!

  • The Importance of Face-to-Face Networking in a Digital World: "The value of face-to-face networking is being recognized as one of the most powerful tools available for increasing one’s personal exposure, creating meaningful relationships and providing growth opportunities at a personal and professional level."

Wednesday, February 8, 2017

4 Tips for Writing Effective Emails at Work

Communication skills can make or break a career and one of the most basic, and overlooked, forms of communication in the workplace is email.

Many people, unthinkingly, jot out their emails in haste, not realizing that they could be damaging their reputations and careers by ineffectively, or rudely, communicating with colleagues.

Here are four tips to avoid that and ensure that your emails enhance, rather than harm, your career.

1. Delay emails when frustrated or angry. Many of us do just the opposite: we receive an email that appears to criticize us or demean an accomplishment and we angrily dash off a snarky email in response. In fact, many of these situations would be best handled with a face-to-face conversation but, if you must reply by email, take some time to calm down and relax, write a brief email, and perhaps even suggest a meeting in person to discuss the issue in more detail.

2. Send email only to the individuals who really need to receive it. We've all been on the receiving end of email strings that go to large groups and are largely irrelevant to the majority of people who are cc:d. Don't be like this; it only annoys colleagues. Be sure to send your emails only to those most impacted by your email. 

3. Be clear about the focus of your email. Write a clear, brief, and specific message in the subject line of your email. This will help your readers understand the content and priority of your message.

4. Write brief messages. An email should not be a lengthy report. It should, in fact, be brief and to the point. "I am working on A, B, and C", for example, or "Our priorities for the week should be X, Y, and Z." Use short, concise, and clear statements for your readers and use language that appears courteous, rather than curt and rude.

Focusing on these four tips will increase your effectiveness when communicating by email. 

Monday, February 6, 2017

Daily Leap Career Video of the Week: How to Find Your Higher Calling

Each week we present our Daily Leap Career Video of the Week. The video we share presents news or advice related to career and life development, searching for a job, the economy and employment, and other career-related topics.

In the video below from Inc., Sprinklr founder Ragy Thomas talks about finding your higher calling in your career and moving beyond the barriers to it.

Friday, February 3, 2017

High 5 Weekly Career Transitions Roundup: Tips for Showcasing Soft Skills on Job Interviews

This is our weekly roundup of some of the best career-related articles, interviews, blogs, etc., we've read during the week. We share them so you have some great resources to prepare you for the coming week. Enjoy!

Wednesday, February 1, 2017

4 Ways to Prepare for an Unexpected Layoff

It's an experience that we anticipate with dread: that call into our manager's office, letting us know that we're being let go. It usually doesn't make us feel better to know the circumstances, whether the company is down-sizing or eliminating a specific area. Our focus is on the immediate. What do I do now?

Fortunately, there are some ways you can prepare for this future possibility and reduce some of the sting of it.

Below are four ways you can prepare for an unexpected layoff:

1. Keep your resume and LinkedIn profile up to date. In the event of a sudden, unexpected layoff you'll be grateful that you've kept your resume up to date. It will decrease your concerns about preparing for the job hunt and will help you focus on job opportunities that are best suited to you and your strengths and skills. Be active on LinkedIn and let other know you are looking for new opportunities. Schedule time in your schedule every three months to tweak your resume and LinkedIn profile.

2. Stay engaged with your network. Be sure you're taking some time each week to stay connected with your colleagues--both in the office and those you know virtually or through conferences, or previous places of employment. Often these will be the first people you'll contact about work and job openings.

3. Be involved in a professional organization. Nearly every profession has some type of professional organization and associated conferences you can get involved with. Start now and make a point of having at least one conference you attend annually. Not only will you increase your knowledge base, and build your network, but professional organizations often provide resources and information for job seekers.

4. Contribute to a "rainy day" fund. Finally, prepare in advance to handle the financial storm of an unexpected layoff by regularly putting aside some money from your paycheck into a savings account. And be sure not to touch it! You'll be grateful it's there if the unexpected happens.