Monday, December 30, 2013

Daily Leap Career Video of the Week: What Will Future Jobs Look Like?

Each week we present our Daily Leap Career Video of the Week. The video we share presents news or advice related to career development, searching for a job, the economy and employment, and other career-related topics.

In this video, economist Andrew McAfee thinks through what future jobs might look like, and how to educate coming generations to hold them.

Learn more in the video below:


Friday, December 27, 2013

High 5 Weekly Career Transitions Roundup: Holiday Movie Lessons

This is our weekly roundup of some of the best career-related articles, interviews, blogs, etc., we've read during the week. We share them so you have some great resources to prepare you for the coming week. Enjoy!

© Bellemedia | Stock Free Images & Dreamstime Stock Photos

Wednesday, December 25, 2013

Green Job Series: Careers in Biofuels [Fourth Installment]

The biofuels industry employs a wide range of workers in a variety of occupations. This installment of The Daily Leap's green job series profiles agriculture occupations in the biofuels industry.

Agriculture Occupations

Farms are needed to grow corn, soybeans, and the other feedstocks used in making biofuels. These crops must be planted and cultivated before they are harvested and transported to grain elevators and processing plants.

Job Duties

Farmers and other agricultural managers, sometimes called growers, run establishments that produce crops that are used to make fuel. They supervise work being done by laborers and make decisions about where and when to plant various crops. They oversee the day-to-day operations of the farm or agricultural establishment.

Agricultural laborers maintain the quality of farms and crops by doing manual labor under the supervision of agricultural managers. They plant, cultivate, and harvest crops, which are used as fuel feedstocks.

Agricultural equipment operators operate farm equipment, such as tractors and combines, to sow seeds, and maintain and harvest crops.

Education

Farmers and agricultural managers typically need a high school diploma or equivalent, although some may have a degree from an agricultural college. Prospective farmers and agricultural managers typically train and gain experience under more experienced workers. Those farmers and agricultural managers who don't have any postsecondary education may take a longer time to learn some aspects of the job.

Most agricultural laborer and equipment operator positions do not have a formal education requirement. Workers typically learn through on-the-job training. It is important for these workers to have strength and stamina because the work can be physically demanding. Good hand-eye coordination is often needed to harvest crops and operate farm machinery.

Earnings

The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) currently does not have wage data specific to the biofuels industry. However, BLS does have green goods and services (GGS) wage data for occupations in agricultural production. The table that follows shows GGS-OCC wages for selected agricultural occupations in November 2011, for establishments that receive all of their revenue from green goods and services. The wages shown are GGS-OCC median annual wages for the United States as a whole; wages vary by employer and location.


Occupation Median annual wage
Farmers, ranchers, and other agricultural managers $52,180
Farmworkers and laborers, crop, nursery, and greenhouse $19,130
Agricultural equipment operators $21,340

For more detailed information on agriculture occupations in the biofuels industry, click the Occupational Outlook Handbook link.

Next week’s biofuels industry installment: Plant Operations Occupations

Monday, December 23, 2013

Daily Leap Career Video of the Week: A New Mission for Veterans—Disaster Relief

Each week we present our Daily Leap Career Video of the Week. The video we share presents news or advice related to career development, searching for a job, the economy and employment, and other career-related topics.

In this video, Jake Wood, co-founder and the president of the disaster relief nonprofit Team Rubicon, explains how military veterans can effectively contribute to disaster relief responses—and in the process, regain purpose, community, and self-worth.

Learn more in the video below:


Friday, December 20, 2013

High 5 Weekly Career Transitions Roundup: Goofy Freelancing Advice

This is our weekly roundup of some of the best career-related articles, interviews, blogs, etc., we've read during the week. We share them so you have some great resources to prepare you for the coming week. Enjoy!

© Bellemedia | Stock Free Images & Dreamstime Stock Photos

Wednesday, December 18, 2013

Green Job Series: Careers in Biofuels [Third Installment]

The biofuels industry employs a wide range of workers in a variety of occupations. This installment of The Daily Leap's green job series profiles construction occupations in the biofuels industry.

Construction Occupations

Construction workers build the processing plants where biofuels are made. Much of the future construction needs from the biofuels industry will be driven by cellulosic technology, using nonfood biomass to create biofuels. The advances in processing additional feedstocks have created demand for processing plants that can convert multiple crops into fuel.

Construction workers are also needed to convert existing infrastructure at gas stations so that they can support higher blends of fuel. There may also be career opportunities in the design and construction of feedstock pre-processing facilities to condense biomass feedstocks before transportation to fuel production plants.

Job Duties

Construction managers plan, coordinate, budget, and supervise construction projects from early development to completion. They oversee new construction of biofuel and feedstock processing plants as well as the retrofitting of existing plants. Construction managers work with various specialists, such as architects and engineers, to get the plant built on time and within a budget.

Construction laborers perform tasks that require physical labor on construction sites, many of which are physically demanding. They build new biofuel plants and convert existing plants so that they can also produce fuel using cellulosic feedstocks. And as more ethanol blend fuels are made available, these workers will build new tanks to hold them or install blender pumps to existing tanks.

Construction equipment operators drive, maneuver, or control the heavy machinery used in construction. They operate various types of equipment, such as bulldozers, forklifts, and cranes. They use these machines to build processing plants and to install new fuel tanks at gas stations.

Education

Most construction managers have a bachelor's degree in construction science, construction management, architecture, or engineering. However, a combination of work experience and an associate's degree may meet the qualifications of some employers. Managers must have time-management skills and decision-making skills to ensure that each task involved in a project is assigned to the appropriate party and that each task is completed on time.

Most employers hiring construction laborers do not have a formal education requirement. The majority of laborers learn their skills through on-the-job-training, either informally or through an apprenticeship program. Construction workers must have strength and stamina for lifting heavy objects and performing other strenuous tasks throughout the day.

Construction equipment operators may learn the skills needed for their job through on-the-job training, an apprenticeship, or at a trade school. A high school diploma and a commercial driver's license may be required. They should have good eye-hand-foot coordination because they control powerful machinery.

Earnings

The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) currently does not have wage data specific to the biofuels industry. However, BLS does have wage data for the basic chemical manufacturing industry group; the following table shows wages for selected construction occupations in that industry group for May 2011. The wages shown are median annual wages for the United States as a whole; wages vary by employer and location.


Occupation Median annual wage
Construction managers $101,970
Construction laborers $29,730
Operating engineers and other construction equipment operators $33,440

For more detailed information on construction occupations in the biofuels industry, click the Occupational Outlook Handbook link.

Next week’s biofuels industry installment: Agriculture Occupations

Monday, December 16, 2013

Daily Leap Career Video of the Week: Your Body Language Shapes Who You Are

Each week we present our Daily Leap Career Video of the Week. The video we share presents news or advice related to career development, searching for a job, the economy and employment, and other career-related topics.

In this video, social psychologist Amy Cuddy shows how “power posing”—standing in a posture of confidence, even when we don’t feel confident—affects our body chemistry, influences how others see us, and might even have an impact on our chances for job interviewing success.

Learn more in the video below:


Friday, December 13, 2013

High 5 Weekly Career Transitions Roundup: Staying Positive After Layoff

This is our weekly roundup of some of the best career-related articles, interviews, blogs, etc., we've read during the week. We share them so you have some great resources to prepare you for the coming week. Enjoy!

© Bellemedia | Stock Free Images & Dreamstime Stock Photos

Wednesday, December 11, 2013

Green Job Series: Careers in Biofuels [Second Installment]

The biofuels industry employs a wide range of workers in a variety of occupations. This installment of The Daily Leap's green job series profiles engineering occupations in the biofuels industry.

Engineering Occupations

In the biofuels industry, many engineers are involved in much of the same work as scientists, evaluating both existing and potential feedstocks, and examining which sources provide the best energy at a reasonable cost. However, they also may work on processing facility design and be familiar with industrial equipment.

Job Duties

Agricultural engineers study existing and potential feedstocks to determine which plants can be best used to produce fuel. They must consider the best time of year for various feedstocks to be grown and the best location to cultivate them, as well as the waste products that will be generated in their production.

Chemical engineers design plant equipment and establish various processes and protocols for manufacturing biofuels as well as the chemicals that are used to convert raw materials into fuel.

Chemical engineers and biochemical engineers often work together in a biofuel production facility. For instance, biochemical engineers develop and implement a fermentation process for production of ethanol from sugars, and chemical engineers distill and purify the compound.

Civil engineers design and supervise the construction of biofuel processing plants. When designing a plant, they consider a number of factors, including costs, government regulations, potential environmental hazards, and proximity to feedstocks. They may need to retrofit an existing petroleum plant or convert a biofuel plant so that it can process additional types of feedstocks.

Electrical engineers may work with various motors, power generation equipment, lighting, or any electrical controls for industrial equipment that are needed for a biofuel plant to run.

Environmental engineers work to improve waste treatments and water systems, and to find ways to limit emissions from fuel processing. For instance, an environmental engineer may work to minimize the natural gases that are released while burning materials at a biofuel plant, thereby preventing or reducing the degradation of the atmosphere or local soil and water systems.

Industrial engineers may work to determine the most efficient way to use workers, machines, materials, information, and energy to make biofuels using a given feedstock or chemical process.

Mechanical engineers research, design, develop, build, and test mechanical devices, including tools, engines, and machines used in a processing plant. They may work on developing precursor equipment that can begin the process of breaking feedstocks down into sugar before they are transported to a processing plant.

Education and Licensing

Engineering jobs typically require a bachelor's degree in a related engineering field. However, some jobs, particularly those involved in research and development or those at the managerial level may require advanced degrees or work experience. Many engineer jobs also require a professional engineer (PE) license, which requires a degree, work experience, and passing written exams. Civil engineers who exercise direct control of a project or those who supervise other engineers must have a license.

Earnings

The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) currently does not have wage data specific to the biofuels industry. However, BLS does have wage data for the basic chemical manufacturing industry group; the following table shows wages for selected science occupations in that industry group for May 2011. The wages shown are median annual wages for the United States as a whole; wages vary by employer and location.


Occupation Median annual wage
Agricultural engineers $74,630
Chemical engineers $96,870
Civil engineers $96,370
Electrical engineers $85,350
Environmental engineers $89,070
Industrial engineers $79,530
Mechanical engineers $88,320

For more detailed information on engineering occupations in the biofuels industry, click the Occupational Outlook Handbook link.

Next week’s biofuels industry series installment: Construction Occupations.

Monday, December 9, 2013

Daily Leap Career Video of the Week: Why You Will Fail to Have a Great Career

Each week we present our Daily Leap Career Video of the Week. The video we share presents news or advice related to career development, searching for a job, the economy and employment, and other career-related topics.

In this video, Canadian educator, storyteller, and youth advocate Larry Smith calls out the absurd excuses people invent when they fail to pursue their passions.

Learn more in the video below:


Wednesday, December 4, 2013

Green Job Series: Careers in Biofuels [First Installment]

The United States has increasingly sought ways to develop alternative fuels, such as biofuels. Biofuels are defined as fuels composed of or produced from biological raw materials. Biofuels can reduce the use of oil-based fuels and the release of greenhouse gas emissions.

The biofuels industry provides career opportunities for a vast array of workers, who do such tasks as developing biofuel technologies, growing crops, and processing and selling the fuels. This installment of The Daily Leap's green job series profiles science occupations in the biofuels industry.

Science Occupations

Scientists work to find the best, most cost-effective way of turning feedstocks into fuel. They often work for a wide variety of organizations, such as colleges, private and nonprofit companies, and government agencies. Scientists generally work in offices or laboratories, though some may work in a production plant.

Job Duties

Biochemists and biophysicists study the chemical and physical principles of living things and biological processes. Those who work in alternative fuels may research various technologies that can be used to break down feedstocks into fuel.

Chemists study the properties, structures, compositions, and reactions of matter. They study various chemical processes that can be used to more efficiently produce biofuels. Chemists blend various compounds to see what inputs yield the best quality blends of fuel at a reasonable cost. Based on their findings, they develop new protocols for blending fuels to ensure quality control.

Microbiologists study the growth, structure, development, and characteristics of microscopic organisms, such as bacteria, algae, or plant cells. They may use their knowledge of various forms of bacteria to improve the fermentation process used to make ethanol or to develop new ways of cultivating algae to use as a feedstock.

Soil and plant scientists conduct research on soil, crops, and other agricultural products to find new and improved ways to use various agricultural products for fuel. A plant scientist may test several types of perennial grasses to see which can be most efficiently broken down into simple sugars. Plant scientists also work to improve crop yields by using techniques that could enhance feedstock production efforts.

Education

Most scientist positions require a bachelor's degree from a program that includes both coursework and laboratory hours. A scientist who is leading a research team or conducting independent research may need a master's or doctoral degree to do so. Biochemists and biophysicists typically need a doctoral degree to enter the occupation.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) currently does not have wage data specific to the biofuels industry. However, BLS does have wage data for the basic chemical manufacturing industry group; the following table shows wages for selected science occupations in that industry group for May 2011. The wages shown are median annual wages for the United States as a whole; wages vary by employer and location.


Occupation Median annual wage
Biochemists and biophysicists $63,530
Chemists $75,550
Microbiologists $57,350
Soil and plant scientists $58,940

For more detailed information on science occupations in the biofuels industry, click the Occupational Outlook Handbook link.

Next week's biofuels industry series installment: Engineering Occupations.

Monday, December 2, 2013

Daily Leap Career Video of the Week: Dan Pink on the Puzzle of Motivation

Each week we present our Daily Leap Career Video of the Week. The video we share presents news or advice related to career development, searching for a job, the economy and employment, and other career-related topics.

In this video, Dan Pink, author of five bestselling books about the changing world of work, explains what social scientists have proven but what hiring managers have yet to grasp: intrinsic motivators—autonomy, mastery, and purpose—are more meaningful to the 21st century, global workforce than solely extrinsic incentives, such as bonus, raises, and promotions.

Learn more in the video below:


Friday, November 29, 2013

High 5 Weekly Career Transitions Roundup: Is Your LinkedIn Profile Up to Date?

This is our weekly roundup of some of the best career-related articles, interviews, blogs, etc., we've read during the week. We share these every weekend so you have some great resources to prepare you for the coming week. Enjoy!

© Bellemedia | Stock Free Images & Dreamstime Stock Photos

  • 3 Ways to Optimize Your LinkedIn Profile"By simply beginning a conversation at appropriate moments, you keep your relationships real. This is what networking is all about.                                                     
  • Reduce Your Stress in Two Minutes a Day"Evidence ... suggest(s) knowledge workers check email as much as 36 times an hour. The result is increased stress. Giving each activity your undivided attention ensures you’re in the moment and fully living that experience."

  • The Profit in Principles"When it comes to core principles, those are the words you should constantly review, whether they are the principles of your company or your own personal rules for life."

  • To Grow in Business and In Life, Show Gratitude and Appreciation"The foundation of asset management is gratitude. If you’re grateful for something then you’ll appreciate it; if you appreciate something then you’ll care for it."

Thursday, November 28, 2013

Gratitude: Thanksgiving Day Edition

For the majority of Americans, Thanksgiving Day is devoted to attending parades, consuming feasts, watching football, and preparing to shop on Black Friday, Small Business Saturday, and Cyber Monday. It’s certainly a lot for which to be thankful!

But have you ever spent a brief part of the holiday thinking about your career and workplace with a similar sense of gratitude? Below are links to recent e-articles which may help you start or renew the process.


Wednesday, November 27, 2013

Green Job Series: Careers in Sustainable Forestry [Fourth Installment]

This installment of The Daily Leap's green job series profiles science technician occupations in sustainable forestry.

Science Technician Occupations

Biological technicians, environmental science technicians, and forest and conservation technicians typically assist and are supervised by conservation scientists, environmental scientists and specialists, soil and plant scientists, foresters, and wildlife biologists.

Job Duties

Biological technicians may set up, maintain, and clean laboratory instruments and equipment, such as microscopes, scales, and test tubes. They gather and prepare plant, water, and soil samples for laboratory analysis to test for pollution levels, diseases, and other factors that help determine the overall health level of the forest. Biological technicians may work in laboratories or outdoors, collecting samples and taking measurements.

Environmental science and protection technicians often work on teams with scientists and other technicians, to solve problems related to environmental degradation and public health. They may assist with inspections of forest lands, to ensure that environmental regulations are being followed. They also set up equipment to monitor pollution levels; collect samples of air, soil, water, and other materials for laboratory analysis; and prepare charts and reports that summarize test results.

Forest and conservation technicians work to improve the quality of forests and other natural resources. They assist with a variety of tasks, including gathering data on water and soil quality, assessing fire hazards, selecting and marking trees to be cut, tracking wildlife, and monitoring the activities of loggers and other forest users. Forest and conservation technicians may also supervise forest and conservation workers.


Education and Training

Biological technicians and environmental science and protection technicians typically have an associate's degree or comparable postsecondary training. Novice technicians are often trained on the job by more-experienced technicians. Technicians may receive their training at a technical or community college.

Forest and conservation technicians typically need an associate's degree in forestry or a related field. Employers look for technicians who have a degree that is accredited by the Society of American Foresters. Many technical and community colleges offer programs in forestry technology or a related field. Some states have licensing and registration programs for forest and conservation technicians. These programs usually have requirements for education and work experience.

Earnings

The table that follows shows wages for selected science technician occupations in May 2012. The wages shown are median annual wages for the United States as a whole; wages vary by employer and location.


Occupation Median annual wage
Biological technicians $39,750
Environmental science and protection technicians $41,240
Forest and conservation technicians $33,920

For more detailed information on science technician occupations in sustainable forestry, follow the Occupational Outlook Handbook link.

Tuesday, November 26, 2013

Daily Leap Career Video of the Week: Guy Kawasaki on Enchantment

Each week we present our Daily Leap Career Video of the Week. The video we share presents news or advice related to career development, searching for a job, the economy and employment, and other career-related topics.

In this video author Guy Kawasaki discusses enchantment--a deep, mutually beneficial, voluntary, long-lasting relationship--and its impact on personal success.

Learn more in the video below:


Friday, November 22, 2013

High 5 Weekly Career Transitions Roundup: Building Mental Strength

This is our weekly roundup of some of the best career-related articles, interviews, blogs, etc., we've read during the week. We share these every weekend so you have some great resources to prepare you for the coming week. Enjoy!

© Bellemedia | Stock Free Images & Dreamstime Stock Photos

  • 8 Things to Do Before Starting a Business"Rather than ditching your job, setting up shop for yourself and just hoping that the clients come, try out your business idea on the side first – while you keep your day job."
  • The New Rules of Being Professional in the Workplace"Dependability means you follow through by doing what you say you're going to do. This quality will help differentiate you from the masses. Being a person of your word is a valuable reputation to establish.                                                     
  • Mentally Strong People: The 13 Things They Avoid"Mentally strong people don't complain (much) about bad traffic, lost luggage, or especially about other people, as they recognize that all of these factors are generally beyond their control."

  • What Inexperienced Leaders Get Wrong"Good management is a series of well thought-through actions including phases, communications, checkpoints, customer-impact-testing, metrics, contingencies, and feedback loops, designed to produce specified results on time and on budget, based on known circumstances."

  • How to Inspire Your Team on a Daily Basis"One of the key qualities when it comes to leadership is the ability to be decisive under pressure. Leadership is all about making decisions and sticking to those decisions."

Thursday, November 21, 2013

Green Job Series: Careers in Sustainable Forestry [Third Installment]

Scientists have an important role in sustainable forestry. They monitor the overall health of forests, as well as study and analyze specific aspects of living things, such as tree and other plant life and wildlife. Scientists also advise other forest workers on how to maintain a forest ecosystem and improve its productivity.

This installment of The Daily Leap's green job series profiles selected science occupations in sustainable forestry.

Science Occupations

Many types of science occupations, including conservation scientists, foresters, environmental scientists and specialists, soil and plant scientists, and wildlife biologists, are involved in sustainable forestry.

Job Duties

Conservation scientists work with forest owners, managers, and government agencies to devise ways to use and improve land, while safeguarding the environment and controlling erosion. They help landowners by preparing land use plans to meet conservation objectives and determine the most appropriate use for a particular forest site.

Foresters have a wide range of duties, and their responsibilities vary depending on their employer. Some primary duties of foresters include drawing up plans to regenerate forested lands, monitoring the progress of those lands, and supervising tree harvests. Foresters also create plans and do inspections to protect forests from disease, harmful insects, and damaging wildfires.

Foresters may choose and direct the preparation of sites on which trees will be planted. They advise on the type, number, and placement of trees. To ensure sustainability in a specific location, foresters may compare the growth with the decline of various species and the size of trees, and use that information to determine which trees should be harvested and sold to mills. Their volunteer or outreach work may include educating teachers and students about problems facing forest lands.

Environmental scientists and specialists may reclaim lands and bodies of water that have been contaminated by pollution, for example, or assess the risks of logging or other forest activities. They recommend ways to minimize the environmental impact of these activities.

Soil and plant scientists research soil, plants, and other forest products. Soil scientists examine the composition of soil as it relates to plant or tree growth and investigate effects of alternative soil treatment practices on tree productivity. They develop methods of conserving and managing soil. Plant scientists strive to improve timber yields, and they advise foresters and other sustainable forestry workers about techniques that could enhance production efforts.

Wildlife biologists work closely with public officials to develop wildlife management and conservation plans. These plans help ensure that wildlife species are protected from threats and that animal populations remain at sustainable levels.

Education and Training

Scientists need a bachelor's or higher degree. Conservation scientists typically need a degree in natural resource management or a related science field, such as agricultural science, soil and plant science, or environmental science. Soil and plant scientists generally have a degree in soil science, chemistry, geology, or a related field. Wildlife biologists need a degree in biology or zoology, and environmental scientists need a natural science or in environmental science degree. Although graduate work is not generally required, many scientists also have a master's degree or a Ph.D. Some wildlife biologists have a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) degree.

Foresters enter the occupation with at least a bachelor's degree in forestry, forest resource management, or a related field. Sixteen states sponsor some type of credentialing process for foresters. Some states require licensing, others have laws requiring registration, and a few have a voluntary registration process. Licensing and registration usually requires that an applicant have a 4-year degree in forestry and several years of forestry work experience. Licensure requirements may also include passing a written exam.

Earnings

The table that follows shows wages for selected science occupations in May 2012. The wages shown are median annual wages for the United States as a whole; wages vary by employer and location.


Occupation Median annual wage
Conservation scientists $61,100
Foresters $55,950
Environmental scientists and specialists, including health $63,570
Soil and plant scientists $58,740
Zoologists and wildlife biologists $57,710

For more detailed information on science occupations in sustainable forestry, follow the Occupational Outlook Handbook link.

Next week's final sustainable forestry series installment: Science Technician Occupations.

Wednesday, November 20, 2013

Green Job Series: Careers in Sustainable Forestry [Second Installment]

Fires have an important role in forest ecology. In some extreme forest conditions, small fires turn into large, catastrophic fires that cause significant damage to the forest. However, some species of trees release seeds and spur new growth only in the presence of fires. Managing forest fires is an important part of sustainable forestry.

This installment of The Daily Leap's green job series profiles selected fire protection and prevention occupations in sustainable forestry.

Fire Protection and Prevention Occupations

Workers in these occupations typically spend most of their time outdoors, sometimes under potentially dangerous conditions. They use a variety of tools and equipment in their work. Fire protection and prevention workers must be physically fit, because their jobs are physically demanding and may involve walking long distances through heavily forested areas and wetlands.

Job Duties

Forest firefighters use heavy equipment, hand tools, and water hoses to control forest fires. They also create fire breaks (gaps in vegetation that slow or stop the progress of a fire) to deprive fires of fuel. Some elite forest firefighters, known as smoke jumpers, parachute from planes to reach areas that would otherwise be inaccessible.

Forest firefighters are expected to respond to forest fires during all hours of the day and night and may spend several consecutive days or weeks fighting a fire. Many forest firefighters work on a seasonal basis, generally from early spring to late summer.

Forest firefighters sometimes assist foresters with conducting controlled burns, in which fires are intentionally set to clear underbrush and manage the growth of plants and trees in the forest.

Forest fire inspectors and prevention specialists inspect forests for fire hazards. They look for problems that pose a wildfire risk and recommend ways to reduce fire hazards. They patrol forest areas, to ensure compliance with fire regulations, and report fire conditions to a central command center. Most forest fire inspectors and prevention specialists work for state and local governments.

Education and Training

Forest firefighters need to be at least 18 years old and need a high school diploma or equivalent. They are required to pass a physical fitness test, and they receive most of their training on the job. Firefighters who plan and oversee controlled burns must complete additional training and become certified as a burn boss.

Forest fire inspectors and prevention specialists have at least a high school diploma; however, some positions require that workers have an associate's or bachelor's degree. Work experience in firefighting or fire suppression also may be necessary.

Earnings

The table that follows shows wages for selected forest fire protection and prevention occupations in May 2012. The wages shown are median annual wages for the United States as a whole; wages vary by employer and location.


Occupation Median annual wage
Forest firefighters $45,250
Forest fire inspectors and prevention specialists $35,780

For more detailed information on fire protection and prevention occupations in sustainable forestry, follow the Occupational Outlook Handbook link.

Tomorrow's sustainable forestry series installment: Science Occupations.

Tuesday, November 19, 2013

Daily Leap Career Video of the Week: The Value of Simplicity

Each week we present our Daily Leap Career Video of the Week. The video we share presents news or advice related to career development, searching for a job, the economy and employment, and other career-related topics.

In this video author Dave Kerpen discusses the importance of simplicity and how successful businesses and products simply add value to people's lives.

Learn more in the video below:


Friday, November 15, 2013

High 5 Weekly Career Transitions Roundup: Networking Success

This is our weekly roundup of some of the best career-related articles, interviews, blogs, etc., we've read during the week. We share these every weekend so you have some great resources to prepare you for the coming week. Enjoy!

© Bellemedia | Stock Free Images & Dreamstime Stock Photos

  • 7 Secrets to Networking Success"Always be willing and eager to help others with an introduction or your time. And do not expect anything in return."

  • What Would Make You More Satisfied and Productive at Work?"If we have no sense that the work we’re doing taps our strengths and our preferences, or provides us with a sense of meaning, we’re likely to be less engaged and productive at work.

  • How to Land an Interview Using Social Media"Most employers do online searches on candidates before extending an interview or job offer. If the results come back showing their deep knowledge or interest in areas related to the organization, the likelihood of getting a call will be much greater."

  • How to Start Thinking About a Career Change"To make a successful career change you will need to organize and articulate your assets in a way that you and the prospective employers can easily understand."

  • The Career Dilemma of When to Move On"The decision to leave a company and move on to a new project is never an easy one. You leave behind years of work and often a stable, promising business for a world of unknowns."

Wednesday, November 13, 2013

Green Job Series: Careers in Sustainable Forestry [First Installment]

Trees provide many of the products, including lumber, paper, and cloth, that we need in a modern economy. Sustainable forestry ensures that forests are used in the most effective way and trees are protected against the harmful effects of pollution, fires, pests, and diseases, and they are not overharvested in a manner that does not allow regrowth and regeneration.

Jobs that are involved in this balance of fulfilling consumer needs and preserving the forest environment relate to careers in sustainable forestry. This installment of The Daily Leap's green job series profiles selected forest conservation and logging occupations in sustainable forestry.

Forest Conservation and Logging Occupations

Forest and conservation workers and loggers who practice sustainable forestry cultivate and harvest thousands of acres of timber each year in environmentally friendly ways. Conservation and logging work is physically demanding, and logging jobs can be hazardous. Workers spend nearly all of their time outdoors, sometimes in poor weather and often in isolated areas. Loggers work in teams, with each worker specializing in a certain task.

Job Duties

Forest and conservation workers help to develop, maintain, and protect forests. Under the supervision of foresters and forest and conservation technicians, forest and conservation workers help to sustain and develop forests by doing tasks, such as planting seedlings or removing diseased trees. They may spray trees and seedlings with insecticides and fungicides, to control insects and weed growth.

Forest and conservation workers may work on tree farms, where they plant, cultivate, and harvest different types of trees. Workers who are employed by state and local governments clear brush and debris from trails, roadsides, and camping areas. Forest and conservation workers who have a fire protection background may help prevent fires by constructing fire breaks or assisting with controlled burns.

Fallers cut down trees with hand-held power chain saws and mobile felling machines. They ensure that the tree is cut safely, so that it falls in the direction desired to avoid hitting other workers or landing on equipment.

Logging equipment operators use tree harvesters to fell trees, shear tree limbs, and cut the trees into desired lengths. They drive tractors and operate self-propelled machines, called skidders or forwarders, which drag or transport logs to a loading area.

Log graders and scalers inspect logs for defects and measure the logs to determine their volume. They estimate the value of the logs or pulpwood (logs that are ground up for paper products). These workers often use handheld data collection devices to enter data about trees.

Other logging workers include buckers, who trim the tops and branches of felled trees and buck (cut) the logs into specific lengths; choke setters, who fasten chokers (steel cables or chains) around logs to be dragged by tractors or forwarded by a cable-yarding system; and rigging slingers and chasers, who set up and dismantle cables and guy wires of the yarding system. In addition, log sorters, markers, movers, and chippers sort, mark, and move logs based on species, size, and ownership, and they tend machines that chip up logs.

Education and Training

Forest and conservation workers typically need a high school diploma before they begin working. They generally get on-the-job training by helping more experienced workers. Most logging workers have a high school diploma. They get on-the-job training, to become familiar with forest environments and to learn how to operate logging machinery.

Many states have training programs for logging workers, which may include technical instruction or field training in areas such as best management practices, environmental compliance, and reforestation. Safety is a vital part of a logging worker’s instruction. Tree fallers require more skill and experience than do workers in other logging occupations, so fallers typically work under the direct supervision of more-experienced logging workers.

Earnings

The table that follows shows wages for selected logging occupations in the forestry and logging subsector in May 2012. The wages shown are median annual wages for the United States as a whole; wages vary by employer and location.


Occupation Median annual wage
Forest and conservation workers $24,340
Fallers $35,250
Logging equipment operators $33,380
Log graders and scalers $32,880
Logging workers, all other $34,260

For more detailed information on forest conservation and logging occupations in sustainable forestry, follow the Occupational Outlook Handbook link.

Next week's sustainable forestry installment: Fire Protection and Prevention Occupations.

Tuesday, November 12, 2013

Daily Leap Career Video of the Week: Be Productive in the Morning

Each week we present our Daily Leap Career Video of the Week. The video we share presents news or advice related to career development, searching for a job, the economy and employment, and other career-related topics.

In this video author Laura Vanderkam discusses how successful people are productive in the morning and offers some tips on making your mornings more productive.

Learn more in the video below:


Monday, November 11, 2013

Remembering Our Veterans and Active Duty Personnel

With heartfelt gratitude for their outstanding service, bravery, and sacrifice, we dedicate today’s Daily Leap post to our nation's veterans and active duty personnel who now look to transition from the armed services to the civilian workforce.


Friday, November 8, 2013

High 5 Weekly Career Transitions Roundup: Is it Time to Quit Your Job?

This is our weekly roundup of some of the best career-related articles, interviews, blogs, etc., we've read during the week. We share these every weekend so you have some great resources to prepare you for the coming week. Enjoy!

© Bellemedia | Stock Free Images & Dreamstime Stock Photos

  • Should You Quit Your Day Job?"Playing it safe and not taking chances to stretch yourself, means that in 2-3 years you’ll be exactly the same person as you are today. This sends a signal to recruiters and hiring managers that you have plateaued."
  • 9 Ways to Win Over Your Boss"If something isn’t at the top of your list but your boss expresses that it’s a priority – then it immediately becomes your priority, too.                                                     
  • The Most Important 15 Minutes of My Day"I’m a huge fan of highly regimented creativity – a notion that seems paradoxical, I know. But it works."

  • How to Build an Ironclad Network"Your request for a conversation must be sincere and free of hidden agendas. You will not ask for a job, you won't even mention the word job during your conversation."

  • 5 Tricks to Starting a Business While Working Full Time"If you haven't already realized that there's no true job security, now is a good time to start thinking about how you could bring in additional streams of revenue."

Thursday, November 7, 2013

Green Job Series: Careers in Water Conservation [Sixth Installment]

Workers in water operations occupations keep the water flowing by pumping water out of the ground and controlling water and wastewater treatment plants.

This installment of The Daily Leap's green job series profiles key water operations occupations in water conservation.

Water Operations Occupations

Workers in water operations occupations are employed by water utilities or local governments. Water and wastewater treatment plant operators work indoors in water or sewage treatment plants. Pump operators may work outdoors or in pumping facilities.

Job Duties

Water and wastewater treatment plant operators manage the systems of machines that transfer or treat water or wastewater. They add chemicals to disinfect water, inspect plant equipment, and monitor operating conditions, meters, and gauges. These workers also collect and test water and sewage material and operate the equipment that purifies water and disposes of sewage.

Water must go through a treatment plant at some point between the original source and the local water supply. Water treatment plant operators ensure that water is clean and safe to drink before it reaches customers. After water is used, it flows through sewer systems to a wastewater treatment plant. There, it is cleaned and filtered before being released back into the environment or being reclaimed.

Pump operators, except wellhead pumpers operate the pumps that move water through pipes to another area. These pipes can be very large and move huge volumes of water over mountains or other terrain, or they may be smaller pumps that move water from one area of a treatment plant to another. Pump operators monitor the flow of water, ensuring that the pump functions properly, and do routine maintenance or repair as needed.

Education and Training

Workers in these occupations usually get on-the-job training to prepare for their jobs. Water and wastewater treatment plant operators typically need a high school diploma and receive more than 12 months of on-the-job training. Formal education is not required to become a pump operator. These workers are typically trained on the job for 1 to 12 months.

Earnings

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) currently does not have wage data specific to the water conservation industry. The table that follows shows wages for selected agriculture and water operations occupations in May 2012. The wages shown are median annual wages for the United States as a whole; wages vary by employer and location.


Occupation Median annual wage
Water and wastewater treatment plant and system operators $42,760
Pump operators, except wellhead pumpers $44,610

For more detailed information on water operations occupations in the water conservation industry, follow the Occupational Outlook Handbook link.

Wednesday, November 6, 2013

Green Job Series: Careers in Water Conservation [Fifth Installment]

Because agriculture is the largest consumer of water resources, agricultural and grounds maintenance workers have a vital role in water conservation. Agricultural workers use more efficient irrigation techniques that provide crops with the optimal amount of water while minimizing water loss. Landscaping and grounds keeping workers maintain outdoor spaces. They ensure that these areas are properly kept up and watered.

This installment of The Daily Leap's green job series profiles key agriculture and grounds maintenance occupations in water conservation.

Agriculture and Grounds Maintenance Occupations

Most agricultural and grounds maintenance workers spend the majority of their time outdoors, and some of the work is physically demanding. Agricultural workers are employed by farms; grounds maintenance workers may be employed by a landscaping company or by any organization that has a large area of landscaped land.

Job Duties

Farmers oversee the production of crops. They supervise all steps of crop production, including planting, fertilizing, watering, and harvesting. They determine how to raise crops, taking into account the amount of water needed and the most efficient way to deliver it. They work with agricultural engineers and other workers to design irrigation systems for their fields and oversee the regular watering of crops.

Agricultural equipment operators use a variety of farm machines to plow fields, sow seeds, and maintain and harvest crops. They also operate heavy machinery to dig irrigation ditches or trenches for pipes. Some operate irrigation equipment, such as overhead sprayers. Equipment operators may also make adjustments or minor repairs.

Farmworkers and laborers handle numerous tasks related to growing and harvesting crops. They may ensure that crops receive enough water and remove weeds or unwanted plants that would consume water.

Landscaping and grounds keeping workers ensure that outdoor areas are properly and efficiently watered. For example, they may water only in the early morning or in the evening, so that water is not lost through evaporation. They may also adjust sprinkler systems so that sprinkler sprays do not overlap or waste water by spraying sidewalks or other non-planted areas.

Education and Training

Most farmers need a high school diploma, and some have a bachelor’s degree from a college of agriculture. Some farmers gain experience growing crops, tending livestock, or working part-time on a farm, others learn through an internship or other farm-based training program.

Agricultural equipment operators require between 1 and 12 months of on-the-job training or a formal training program. Farmworkers and laborers need less than a high school diploma, but may need up to a year of on-the-job training. Landscaping and grounds keeping workers typically do not need any formal education and are trained on-the-job in less than 1 month.

Earnings

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) currently does not have wage data specific to the water conservation industry. The table that follows shows wages for selected agriculture and grounds maintenance occupations in May 2012. The wages shown are median annual wages for the United States as a whole; wages vary by employer and location.


Occupation Median annual wage
Farmers, ranchers, and other agricultural managers $69,300
Agricultural equipment operators $25,860
Farmworkers and laborers, crop, nursery, and greenhouse $18,670
Landscaping and grounds keeping workers $23,570

For more detailed information on agriculture and grounds maintenance occupations in the water conservation industry, follow the Occupational Outlook Handbook link.

Thursday's final water conservation industry series installment: Water Operations Occupations.

Tuesday, November 5, 2013

Daily Leap Career Video of the Week: Millennials and Start-up Culture

Each week we present our Daily Leap Career Video of the Week. The video we share presents news or advice related to career development, searching for a job, the economy and employment, and other career-related topics.

In this video author Dan Schawbel discusses how Millennials are changing corporate America and suggests that successful corporations will be run more like start-up companies.

Learn more in the video below:


Friday, November 1, 2013

High 5 Weekly Career Transitions Roundup: How to be Liked and Happy at Work

This is our weekly roundup of some of the best career-related articles, interviews, blogs, etc., we've read during the week. We share these every weekend so you have some great resources to prepare you for the coming week. Enjoy!

© Bellemedia | Stock Free Images & Dreamstime Stock Photos

  • Update Your Job Search"Recruiters proactively use social media to identify potential candidates instead of waiting for resumes to come in. If you don’t have a social media presence – on LinkedIn, Twitter, or your own website – you aren’t likely to get noticed.                                                     
  • How to Be Happy at Work"One of the quickest and most effective ways to change a 'poor me' attitude is to reach out to someone in the workplace who could use your mentoring or assistance with a project."

  • Here's When You Know It's Time to Change Careers"Most people who want to transition to another career have already invested a good amount of time and money in crafting one career direction, so making a change requires a new level of investment in time, energy and often money."

  • 4 Keys to Workplace Innovation"Organizing forums and inviting speakers are other ways to bring employees into frequent contact with fresh perspectives and rekindle mental energy."

Thursday, October 31, 2013

Green Job Series: Careers in Water Conservation [Fourth Installment]

This installment of The Daily Leap's green job series profiles key construction occupations in water conservation.

Construction Occupations

Construction workers build and install the infrastructure for conserving water. They build new water delivery and storage systems. They also build new dams and reservoirs, dig wells, lay new pipes, and install water-efficient appliances and irrigation systems.

Construction workers typically are employed by construction or utilities companies and spend much of their time outdoors. Their work can be physically demanding.

Job Duties

Construction managers oversee building projects. These may include constructing reservoirs and water treatment plants or installing new pipes and water delivery systems. The primary duties of a construction manager include administering permits, contracts, and the budget, as well as monitoring project quality and safety.

On large assignments, a project manager typically oversees several construction managers who supervise individual aspects of the assignment.

Construction laborers do many of the basic physical tasks onsite. They may clean and prepare construction sites, load or unload building materials, dig trenches, backfill holes, or compact earth to prepare for construction. They do a variety of tasks, from easy to difficult and even hazardous, on almost all construction sites.

Equipment operators use heavy machinery to move construction materials, earth, and other heavy materials at a construction site. They may dig trenches for pipes or clear a large area for a planned reservoir. Equipment operators also control cranes to lift and place heavy objects, such as collectors and storage tanks for rainwater or greywater. They set up, inspect, and adjust equipment and do some maintenance and minor repair.

Pipelayers place pipes outdoors. They install large-diameter pipes, such as water mains, or smaller pipes that carry water from the main to houses or buildings. Pipelayers may also install sewage systems that carry waste to treatment plants.

Plumbers follow detailed construction drawings to install pipes and appliances in buildings and connect them to the water supply. They may remove older fixtures and replace them with water-efficient ones, such as dual-flush toilets and low-flow faucets. Plumbers may also replace leaky pipes or install plumbing systems that accommodate both drinkable and non-drinkable water and thereby allow a building to use rainwater and greywater.

Septic tank servicers and sewer pipe cleaners ensure that septic tanks—tanks that store human waste when sewers are not available—and sewer pipes are clean and that waste material is able to flow through them properly. If septic tanks or sewers become blocked, the waste material backs up and may flow up through drains or seep into the ground nearby, which can contaminate the water supply.

Education, Training, and Licensing

Construction managers typically need a degree in construction management, business management, or engineering and have experience working in construction. Experience is important for construction managers, so it may substitute for some educational requirements. Workers who have an associate’s or bachelor’s degree in construction management or engineering but do not have significant construction experience may be hired as assistants to construction managers. Construction laborers are not required to have a formal education.

Equipment operators often learn on the job, complete an apprenticeship, or do a combination of both to become certified. Becoming certified involves training and testing to ensure competence and safety. Because of safety concerns and the potential danger of operating this equipment, most construction workers are required to pass regular drug screenings.

Pipelayers typically need a high school diploma and are trained on the job in 1 month or less. Plumbers also typically have a high school diploma and receive training through an apprenticeship, which usually lasts 4 to 5 years and involves about 1,700 to 2,000 hours of paid on-the-job training and at least 246 hours of related technical instruction.

Septic tank servicers and sewer pipe cleaners need less than a high school diploma. They are normally trained on the job and are competent in performing their jobs with 1 to 12 months of training.

Earnings

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) currently does not have wage data specific to the water conservation industry. The table that follows shows wages for selected construction occupations in May 2012. The wages shown are median annual wages for the United States as a whole; wages vary by employer and location.


Occupation Median annual wage
Construction managers $82,790
Construction laborers $29,990
Construction equipment operators $40,980
Pipelayers $36,180
Plumbers, pipefitters, and steamfitters $49,140
Septic tank servicers and sewer pipe cleaners $34,020

For more detailed information on construction occupations in the water conservation industry, follow the Occupational Outlook Handbook link.

Next week's water conservation industry series installment: Agriculture and Grounds Maintenance Occupations.