Monday, December 29, 2014

Daily Leap Career Video of the Week: Celebrate Success

Each week we present our Daily Leap Career Video of the Week. The video we share presents news or advice related to career development, searching for a job, the economy and employment, and other career-related topics.

As we come to the end of 2014 it's a good time to recognize and celebrate your successes and wins during the past year. In the following video business coach Tom Ferry talks about the importance of celebrating even the small wins we encounter in our lives.

What successes are you celebrating?


Monday, December 22, 2014

Daily Leap Career Video of the Week: Building Self-Confidence

Each week we present our Daily Leap Career Video of the Week. The video we share presents news or advice related to career development, searching for a job, the economy and employment, and other career-related topics.

In our video today personal development trainer Brendon Burchard shares 5 steps to building self-confidence. According to Brendon, “Confidence means you’re being who you are, authentically, for no other reason. Nobody gave you permission; you just decided to be who you are.”

Enjoy the video and become more self-confident today!



Friday, December 19, 2014

High 5 Weekly Career Transitions Roundup: Personal Branding, Social Media, and Innovative Leaders

This is our weekly roundup of some of the best career-related articles, interviews, blogs, etc., we've read during the week. We share them so you have some great resources to prepare you for the coming week. Enjoy!

© Bellemedia | Stock Free Images & Dreamstime Stock Photos

  • 5 Personal Branding Tips"They should treat themselves like a brand regardless – day job, home, personal life. They have to put their personal brand in two to five words, and they have to be very honest in what they stand for."

  • Tips for Using Social Media to Get a Job"There are lots of local groups sharing job opportunities on Facebook if you search by job type and location."

  • 10 Traits of Innovative Leaders"These leaders believed that the best and most innovative ideas bubbled up from underneath. They strived to create a culture that uncorked good ideas from the first level of the organization."

  • Top 10 Skills to be Successful"You don’t need to know how to build the next Facebook, but a basic understanding of how the Web works and how software and apps are built can be a game-changing advantage."

  • How to Future Proof Your Career"Future-proofed skills can either be essentials (e.g., health, security, utilities, etc.) or play an important part in facilitating a drastic change in the economy, like technology."

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

How to Be More Productive

We have a family tradition in our home of asking each other a simple question while we're having dinner: "How was your day?"

Often, when it's my 4-year-old son's turn he will say, with a mischievous smile and a slight wink in my direction, "Oh, I had a productive day."

Apparently I often answer the "how was your day" question in terms of productivity so it seems
appropriate to highlight some tips to help you (and me) be more productive with our time.

1. Having a productive day starts the day before. Before you leave work for the day or later that evening during some quiet time at home, set your priorities for the next day and list the tasks you need to accomplish. You'll find this enables you to focus more quickly on them the next morning.

2. Get enough sleep. You'll be much more productive if you're not tired and using coffee or sugar drinks to provide you with some temporary energy.

3. Start your day with some exercise. Get moving early and you'll find you have the energy to tackle that list of priorities you set the previous evening.

What suggestions do you have for increasing productivity?

For more tips check out this article.


Monday, December 15, 2014

Daily Leap Career Video of the Week: What Trait is Necessary for Success?

Each week we present our Daily Leap Career Video of the Week. The video we share presents news or advice related to career development, searching for a job, the economy and employment, and other career-related topics.

Today we focus on the trait most necessary for success. This trait is not social intelligence, high I.Q., good physical health, or good looks. In this video psychologist Angela Lee Duckworth discusses the trait she's identified in research as the most responsible for success. 

What do you think that trait is?



Friday, December 12, 2014

High 5 Weekly Career Transitions Roundup: Networking Tips and How to Start a New Job Right

This is our weekly roundup of some of the best career-related articles, interviews, blogs, etc., we've read during the week. We share them so you have some great resources to prepare you for the coming week. Enjoy!

© Bellemedia | Stock Free Images & Dreamstime Stock Photos

  • 6 Holiday Networking Tips"Be curious, and show an interest in others ... ask interesting questions that demonstrate you know something but want to know more."

  • 10 Warning Signs You Need a Career Change"If you lose sleep over the thought of going to work in the morning, it may be time to pack up with the little shred of sanity you have left."

  • 3 Tips to Hit the Ground Running at Your New Job"Your company would not have hired you if you were not exceptional. So be true to who you are, be comfortable being who you are, and be comfortable letting your voice be heard."

  • What to do (and not do) at the Office Holiday Party"Introduce yourself to key players within the corporation and make a good impression by maintaining eye contact, shaking hands and remembering names."

  • What to Do When Your Boss Doesn't Like You"No matter what the situation or the cause of the issue, get stuff done, share the credit, and ask how else you can help—those are tried-and-true strategies for building a solid relationship with your boss."

Wednesday, December 10, 2014

Tips for Staying Positive During the Job Search

It can be difficult to remain positive and upbeat when you're unemployed and looking for a job. 

The holidays can make it even more difficult as some employers will wait until the new year to fill positions or the end of the year causes you to reflect on your current situation or circumstances.

Your attitude is important during the job search and so we recommend taking some time to check out this article offering 5 Tips for Jobseekers to Stay Positive

As the article notes, it's important to provide yourself with the right messages, such as I am qualified: "Cultivate your trust in your abilities and focus on what you can do."

How do you stay upbeat and positive while looking for a job?




Monday, December 8, 2014

Daily Leap Career Video of the Week: Steps to Creating Your Personal Brand

Each week we present our Daily Leap Career Video of the Week. The video we share presents news or advice related to career development, searching for a job, the economy and employment, and other career-related topics.

Today we focus on the importance of creating your personal brand, with five tips from career expert Amanda Rose. 

Are you working on your personal brand?



Friday, December 5, 2014

High 5 Weekly Career Transitions Roundup: How to Choose the Right Career Track

This is our weekly roundup of some of the best career-related articles, interviews, blogs, etc., we've read during the week. We share them so you have some great resources to prepare you for the coming week. Enjoy!

© Bellemedia | Stock Free Images & Dreamstime Stock Photos

Wednesday, December 3, 2014

Your Career To-Do List for a Successful 2015

A recent article noted 35 Things You Should Do For Your Career Before You Turn 35, and while 35 might be a little intimidating, we've broken the list down into something more manageable: 5 Things to Do For a Successful 2015.

1. Understand your strengths. To be successful you should know exactly what it is you're good at and be able to share those strengths with others, including at a job interview.

2. Know your weaknesses. It's also important not to be blind to areas of weakness. However, instead of spending too much time trying to work on your weaknesses learn how to work around them and delegate tasks to others who might be stronger in these areas than you are.

3. Clarify your elevator pitch. Be able to tell someone in 30-45 seconds what exactly it is you do and what your skills and strengths can offer. What message about yourself do you want to leave others with?

4. Clarify what you want. Be sure to understand as clearly as possible what you're looking for in a job or in your career.

5. Build support. There are others out there who can help: mentors, friends, previous employers, current managers. Don't be afraid to let others know what you need and what you're looking for.

What is on your career to-do list for 2015?

Monday, December 1, 2014

Daily Leap Career Video of the Week: Tips on Making a Career Change

Each week we present our Daily Leap Career Video of the Week. The video we share presents news or advice related to career development, searching for a job, the economy and employment, and other career-related topics.

At some point in our professional lives we need to consider whether it's time to make a job or career change. There are a lot of factors that go into making a decision like this and in our featured video, Linda Spencer, the assistant director and coordinator of career advising at Harvard Extension School, provides important tips to aid in the decision.



Friday, March 21, 2014

High 5 Weekly Career Transitions Roundup: Dust Off Your Resume This Spring

This is our weekly roundup of some of the best career-related articles, interviews, blogs, etc., we've read during the week. We share them so you have some great resources to prepare you for the coming week. Enjoy!

© Bellemedia | Stock Free Images & Dreamstime Stock Photos

Wednesday, March 19, 2014

Green Job Series: Careers in Geothermal Energy [Third Installment]

To reach hot water far below the earth's surface, geothermal plants use wells that descend thousands of feet into underground reservoirs. Drilling these wells requires specialized machinery and workers. This installment of The Daily Leap's green job series profiles key drilling occupations in geothermal energy

Drilling Occupations

Drilling crews first drill exploratory wells to confirm the locations of underground reservoirs. After discovering the best locations, they use a derrick, a large, metal framed crane hanging over the main well, to guide drilling equipment. Because drilling equipment is so heavy, derricks are necessary to control and maneuver drilling bits, pipes, and other equipment.

Drilling fluid mixtures that help to break up the rock are pumped into the well through a pipe connected to the drill bit. The pipe also carries debris and mud out of the well and to the surface, where it can be disposed of. As the well gets deeper, new pipe sections are connected to those already in the ground, and the drill continues until it taps the underground reservoir.

Job Duties

Derrick operators control and inspect drilling derricks. These workers can raise or lower the drill bits and pipes into or out of the well. Derrick operators are also responsible for maintaining their machinery and ensuring that it operates correctly.

Rotary driller operators control the drill itself. They determine a drill's pressure and speed as it penetrates rock. To keep drill sites safe, rotary driller operators use gauges that monitor drill pump pressure and other data, such as how much drill mud and debris are being pumped from the well. Rotary drill operators also keep records of where they've drilled and how many layers of rock they've penetrated.

Roustabouts do much of the basic labor on drilling sites. They clean equipment and keep work areas free of the debris and drilling mud that the drill pipes carry up from the wells. Roustabouts also install new pipe sections that allow the drill to reach deeper underground.

In addition to the workers who drill the wells, drilling crews might include some support personnel, such as workers who transport the drilling rigs and fuel to project sites.

Education

There are few formal education requirements for drilling crew workers. Although drilling crew workers are not required to have a high school diploma, some employers might prefer to hire workers who do. While in school, drilling crew workers can learn skills such as basic mechanics, welding, and heavy equipment operations through vocational programs.

Most drilling crew workers start as helpers to experienced workers and are trained on the job. However, formal training is becoming more common as new and more advanced machinery and methods are used. Drilling crew workers usually must be at least 18 years old, be in good physical condition, and pass a drug test.

Wages

The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) does not currently have wage data specific to the geothermal industry. However, BLS does have wage data for drilling crew workers across all industries. The following table shows wages for drilling occupations in that industry group for May 2011. The wages shown are median annual wages for the United States as a whole; wages vary by employer and location.


Occupation Median annual wage
Derrick operators, oil and gas $45,220
Rotary drill operators, oil and gas $51,310
Roustabouts, oil and gas $32,980

For more detailed information on drilling occupations in the geothermal industry, click the Occupational Outlook Handbook link.

Next week's geothermal industry series installment: Construction Occupations.

Monday, March 17, 2014

Daily Leap Career Video of the Week: The Habits of Happiness

Each week we present our Daily Leap Career Video of the Week. The video we share presents news or advice related to career development, searching for a job, the economy and employment, and other career-related topics.

So what is happiness, and how can we all get some? In this video, Biochemist turned Buddhist monk Matthieu Ricard says we can train our minds in habits of well-being, to generate a true sense of serenity and fulfillment.

Click on the link to learn more:
Matthieu Ricard

Friday, March 14, 2014

High 5 Weekly Career Transitions Roundup: Battle Uncertainty

This is our weekly roundup of some of the best career-related articles, interviews, blogs, etc., we've read during the week. We share them so you have some great resources to prepare you for the coming week. Enjoy!

© Bellemedia | Stock Free Images & Dreamstime Stock Photos

Wednesday, March 12, 2014

Green Job Series: Careers in Geothermal Energy [Second Installment]

Designing geothermal plants or new drilling equipment requires the work of many engineers. This installment of The Daily Leap's green job series profiles key engineering occupations in geothermal energy.

Engineering Occupations

Most engineers work in offices, laboratories, or industrial plants, but some work outdoors at construction sites, where they monitor or direct operations or solve onsite problems.

Job Duties

Civil engineers design geothermal plants and supervise the construction phase. Many geothermal plants are built in rocky, difficult terrain, which require special procedures. Civil engineers also have to consider potential hazards such as earthquakes, and build plants to withstand them. These engineers are also responsible for designing access roads that lead to the plants.

Electrical engineers design, develop, test, and supervise the manufacture of geothermal plants' electrical components, including machinery controls, lighting and wiring, generators, communications systems, and electricity transmission systems.

Electronics engineers are responsible for systems that control plant systems or signal processes. Electrical engineers work primarily with power generation and distribution; electronics engineers develop the complex electronic systems used to operate the geothermal plant.

Environmental engineers deal with the potential environmental impacts of geothermal plants. Although geothermal energy is an environmentally friendly source of electricity, environmental engineers must consider a site's potential impact on local plants and wildlife.

Mechanical engineers research, design, develop, and test tools and a variety of machines and mechanical devices. Many of these engineers supervise the manufacturing processes of drilling equipment or various generator or turbine components.

Education

Engineers typically have at least a bachelor's degree in an engineering specialty. However, some jobs require more education, such as a master's degree or doctoral degree. Additionally, an engineer typically must be licensed as a professional engineer (PE) and is expected to complete continuing education to keep current with new technologies.

Entry-level engineers may also be hired as interns or junior team members and work under the close supervision of more senior engineers. As they gain experience and knowledge, they are assigned more difficult tasks and given greater independence.

Engineers are usually required to be certified as competent to carry out specific work, depending on the systems used by a particular geothermal power company.

Wages

The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) currently does not have wage data specific to the geothermal industry. However, BLS does have wage data for the electric power generation, transmission, and distribution industry group. The following table shows wages for engineering occupations in that industry group for May 2011. The wages shown are median annual wages for the United States as a whole; wages vary by employer and location.


Occupation Median annual wage
Civil engineers $84,950
Electrical engineers $84,730
Electronics engineers, except computer $90,790
Environmental engineers $79,530
Mechanical engineers $82,230

For more detailed information on engineering occupations in the geothermal industry, click the Occupational Outlook Handbook link.

Next week's geothermal industry series installment: Drilling Occupations.

Monday, March 10, 2014

Daily Leap Career Video of the Week: How to Make Stress Your Friend

Each week we present our Daily Leap Career Video of the Week. The video we share presents news or advice related to career development, searching for a job, the economy and employment, and other career-related topics.

In this video, Psychologist Kelly McGonigal urges us to see stress as a positive, and introduces us to an unsung mechanism for stress reduction: reaching out to others.

Learn more in the video below:


Sunday, March 9, 2014

High 5 Weekly Career Transitions Roundup: Job Search Lessons from Jimmy Fallon’s Tonight Show Debut

This is our weekly roundup of some of the best career-related articles, interviews, blogs, etc., we've read during the week. We share them so you have some great resources to prepare you for the coming week. Enjoy!

© Bellemedia | Stock Free Images & Dreamstime Stock Photos

  • 5 Job Search Lessons from Jimmy Fallon’s Tonight Show Debut"Recently Jimmy Fallon made the leap to 'The Tonight Show.' For the job seeker on a quest for their own new gig, here are some gems from Fallon’s first day on the job."

  • What HR Won’t Tell You"Human resource professionals are doing the best they can to find and hire the best candidates. What should you know when you’re looking for a job?"

  • Break Into IT with Temporary Work"The business world may be looking for technology pros, but you're not a pro (yet) if you have a new certification and no experience. How do you gain that experience?"

  • 5 Tips for Preventing Age Bias in Your Executive Resume & LinkedIn Profile"Consider these 5 ways to get a better reception from employers – and create an “age-proof” executive resume and LinkedIn Profile-–if you believe age is working against you."

  • The Era of Creative Resumes"For a resume to be effective, it needs much more than just enlisting your details, qualifications, and achievements. This should always be kept in mind when you write modern and creative resumes."

Wednesday, March 5, 2014

Green Job Series: Careers in Geothermal Energy [First Installment]

Geothermal power uses groundwater found deep in underground cracks and reservoirs. The Earth's natural heat has brought these underground reservoirs to temperatures of 225 to 600 degrees Fahrenheit (107 to 315 degrees Celsius).

Geothermal plants capture and use this heat to generate electricity for the power grid. The plants subsequently release the cooled water back into the ground, where it seeps back into the underground reservoir, is reheated by the Earth, and can be reused by the plant.

Through this full cycle, geothermal power provides a renewable and inexhaustible source of energy.

Many different workers are required to get a geothermal plant up and running. This installment of The Daily Leap's green job series profiles key science occupations in geothermal energy.

Science Occupations

Scientists work in offices where they study charts and maps of geothermal resources. They might also travel to the field to examine proposed geothermal sites. Scientists work on teams with other scientists in various disciplines. Geothermal companies employ some scientists full-time, while others are hired as consultants.

Job Duties

Environmental scientists work with geothermal plant developers to help them comply with environmental regulations and policies and to ensure that sensitive parts of the ecosystem are protected. They use their knowledge of the natural sciences to minimize hazards to the health of the environment and the nearby population. These scientists produce environmental impact studies necessary for a geothermal project to earn its building permits.

Geologists spend a large part of their time in the field, identifying and examining the topography and geologic makeup of a geothermal site. Geologists also study maps and charts to ensure that a site will be able to supply adequate geothermal energy. Geologists use their knowledge of different kinds of rock to make recommendations on the most cost-effective areas to drill. Some specialized geologists might help to monitor a plant's location for seismic activity and attempt to predict the threat of earthquakes.

On geothermal projects, hydrologists study the movement, distribution, and other properties of water below the earth's surface. They help decide where to drill wells and analyze the groundwater that is pumped from the underground reservoirs to the surface.

Wildlife biologists evaluate a geothermal plant's effect on local animal life and their ecosystems. Although geothermal plants are not inherently destructive, construction of the related infrastructure, such as plants, roads, and transmission towers, can be disruptive to the natural environment. Wildlife biologists ensure that the plant's impact on local animal populations is minimal.

Education

Although a master's degree is often preferred, a bachelor's degree, depending on the specialty, is typically sufficient for an entry-level position for geologists, environmental scientists, and wildlife biologists. Hydrologists typically enter the occupation with a master's degree. A Ph.D. is desirable for scientists who oversee environmental impact and site suitability studies.

Most scientists must have excellent computer skills because they use computers frequently for data analysis, digital mapping, remote sensing, and computer modeling. Scientists in certain specialties, such as geologists, are usually certified or licensed by a state licensing board.

Wages

The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) currently does not have wage data specific to the geothermal industry. However, BLS does have wage data for the electric power generation, transmission, and distribution industry group. The following table shows wages for science occupations in that industry group for May 2011. The wages shown are median annual wages for the United States as a whole; wages vary by employer and location.


Occupation Median annual wage
Environmental scientists and specialists, including health $87,160
Geoscientists, except hydrologists and geographers $77,460
Hydrologists $75,680
Zoologists and wildlife biologists $57,420

For more detailed information on science occupations in the geothermal industry, click the Occupational Outlook Handbook link.

Next week's geothermal industry series installment: Engineering Occupations.

Monday, March 3, 2014

Daily Leap Career Video of the Week: How to Succeed? Get More Sleep

Each week we present our Daily Leap Career Video of the Week. The video we share presents news or advice related to career development, searching for a job, the economy and employment, and other career-related topics.

In this video, Arianna Huffington , co-founder and editor-in-chief of The Huffington Post, a nationally syndicated columnist, and author of thirteen books, shares a small idea that can awaken much bigger ones: the power of a good night's sleep. As she explains, adequate sleep leads to increased productivity, happiness, and smarter decision-making.

Learn more in the video below:


Sunday, March 2, 2014

High 5 Weekly Career Transitions Roundup: Connecting with a Stranger on LinkedIn

This is our weekly roundup of some of the best career-related articles, interviews, blogs, etc., we've read during the week. We share them so you have some great resources to prepare you for the coming week. Enjoy!

© Bellemedia | Stock Free Images & Dreamstime Stock Photos

Wednesday, February 26, 2014

The Great Migration [Fourth Installment]

In celebration of Black History Month, The Daily Leap presents the final installation of a four-part series on The Great Migration. The series was excerpted from Spencer R. Crews' article "The Great Migration of Afro-Americans, 1915-1940," which appeared in the Monthly Labor Review in March 1987.

Historic Event

The "Great Migration" of African Americans from largely rural areas of the southern United States to northern cities during and after World War I (1915-40) altered the economic, social, and political fabric of American society. More than one million black Americans left the South to seek opportunity and fuller citizenship in the North.

Types of Jobs

African Americans typically wound up in dirty, back-break­ing, unskilled, and low-paying occupations. These were the least desirable jobs in most industries, but the ones employ­ers felt best suited their black workers. On average, more than eight of every ten African American men worked as un­skilled laborers in foundries, in the building trades, in meat-packing companies, on the railroads, or as servants, porters, janitors, cooks, and cleaners. Only a relatively few obtained work in semiskilled or skilled occupations.

Occupational choices for black women were even more limited because few of them, in concordance with women in general, had access to industrial jobs. While some women found employment in the garment industry, packinghouses, and steam laundries, the majority of African American women worked as domestic servants or in service-related occupa­tions. While none of these jobs paid high wages, they paid more than African Americans could obtain for similar work in the South.

However, the cost of living in the North was higher than in the South. Funneled into certain areas in most northern cities, African Americans have paid nearly twice as much as their white counterparts for equivalent housing. Higher rents made it harder for them to make housing payments and encouraged migrants to take in boarders or other family members to help meet expenses. While the extra income eased financial problems, it resulted in overcrowded living conditions, little privacy, and poor sanitation.

With the ad­ditional financial burden of having to pay higher prices in neighborhood stores for food, clothing, and other necessi­ties, settling in the North was a mixed experience for many migrants. Though they earned better wages in the North, much of the increased income was offset by higher living expenses.

Monday, February 24, 2014

Daily Leap Career Video of the Week: Meet Kenneth Chenault

Each week we present our Daily Leap Career Video of the Week. The video we share presents news or advice related to career development, searching for a job, the economy and employment, and other career-related topics.

In celebration of Black History Month, The Daily Leap presents an interview with Kenneth Chenault, CEO and Chairman of American Express Co. Chenault has received the “Phoenix House Public Service Award”, the “Corporate Responsibility Award” from the International Rescue Committee and the “Wall Street Rising Leadership Award,“ among others.

In this interview, Chenault shares his opinion on why there aren't more African Americans, women, and other minorities in leadership roles at U.S. corporations, and what can be done to foster equal representation in the workplace.

Click on link: Kenneth Chenault

Friday, February 21, 2014

High 5 Weekly Career Transitions Roundup: Traits of a Great Job Seeker

This is our weekly roundup of some of the best career-related articles, interviews, blogs, etc., we've read during the week. We share them so you have some great resources to prepare you for the coming week. Enjoy!

© Bellemedia | Stock Free Images & Dreamstime Stock Photos

  • Traits of a Great Job Seeker"Here are seven job seeker traits to consider as you embark upon your job search. These traits have worked for others; hopefully, they will work for you."

  • How to Stalk Your Future Employer (Without Being Creepy)"It might surprise you to learn that, yes, sometimes digging too deep and oversharing what you’ve learned about a potential employer or hiring manager can actually hurt you during the interview process."

  • 3 Tips to Succeed in the Economy of You"No matter where you are with your side-gig--the key to gaining greater professional control and financial security in this modern-day economy--here are the top 3 things you should be doing to ensure success."

  • How to Manage Your Personal Brand When You're in Transition"When you're changing chapters professionally, what's the best way to manage your personal brand? Should you even think about personal branding? Where do you start? Here are some helpful tips."

  • How to Create an Irresistible Resume"The words you choose to communicate your experience make all the difference in whether your resume is considered average or fantastic."

Wednesday, February 19, 2014

The Great Migration [Third Installment]

In celebration of Black History Month, The Daily Leap presents the first installation of a four-part series on The Great Migration. The series was excerpted from Spencer R. Crews' article "The Great Migration of Afro-Americans, 1915-1940," which appeared in the Monthly Labor Review in March 1987.

Historic Event

The "Great Migration" of African Americans from largely rural areas of the southern United States to northern cities during and after World War I (1915-40) altered the economic, social, and political fabric of American society. More than one million black Americans left the South to seek opportunity and fuller citizenship in the North.

Problems of Leave-taking

Once a decision to depart was made, leaving was often a complicated process. Southern officials tried to slow the tide of migration by arresting or detaining African Americans who tried to leave. Local police regularly searched departing trains for people they thought might be heading North. To escape police scrutiny, many migrants had to steal away late at night or devise elaborate plans to get away safely.

These subterfuges forced the migrants either to sell their property and belongings secretly or to take with them only what they could carry. Most migrants were working people who did not possess great wealth and leaving under these circumstances hurt them financially. Items left behind or given away brought in no money and buyers rarely gave full value for items they knew the owner had to sell.

Many migrants, therefore, did not have enough money with them to tide them over for long periods of time once they reached the North. Consequently, finding a job became a high priority as soon as they arrived.

While job opportunities were readily available in most cities, these jobs were at the lower end of the occupational ladder. Northern labor unions generally did not accept African Americans as members and often threatened to strike companies where nonunion workers performed union jobs. Even when African American workers acquired better paying jobs during the war, many of them had to relinquish these jobs once the war ended.

Monday, February 17, 2014

Daily Leap Career Video of the Week: Meet Ursula Burns

Each week we present our Daily Leap Career Video of the Week. The video we share presents news or advice related to career development, searching for a job, the economy and employment, and other career-related topics.

In celebration of Black History Month, The Daily Leap presents an interview with Ursula Burns, CEO and Chairperson of the Board of Xerox Corp. Burns is the first African-American woman to be CEO of a Fortune 500 company.

Click on link: Ursula Burns

Sunday, February 16, 2014

High 5 Weekly Career Transitions Roundup: 6 Jobs for Romantics

This is our weekly roundup of some of the best career-related articles, interviews, blogs, etc., we've read during the week. We share them so you have some great resources to prepare you for the coming week. Enjoy!

© Bellemedia | Stock Free Images & Dreamstime Stock Photos

  • 6 Jobs for Romantics"If you’re in love with love 365 days a year, why not consider working a job that allows you to be around romance all day long? Here are six jobs for all of you romantics out there."

  • How to Find a Job Using Google+"What can Google+ possibly offer job seekers? In a nutshell: a lot."

  • 5 Questions to Ask Yourself Before Accepting a Job Offer You Don’t Love"Out of all of the interviews, you received one job offer. It wasn’t exactly what you wanted. Do you accept it? If you find yourself in this situation, here are some things to consider when accepting a job offer in which you aren’t completely in love."

  • Your Company's in Turmoil. Should You Jump Ship?"If your company is entering choppy waters, here are three questions to ask yourself to determine if it’s time to jump ship or settle in for the long haul."

  • How to Stop Office Negativity"The majority of your time is spent at work. Regardless of whether you love your job, or whether it’s only a necessity for keeping a roof over your kids’ heads, you can make it a happier and better place to be all those hours."

Wednesday, February 12, 2014

The Great Migration [Second Installment]

In celebration of Black History Month, The Daily Leap presents the second installation of a four-part series on The Great Migration. The series was excerpted from Spencer R. Crews' article "The Great Migration of Afro-Americans, 1915-1940," which appeared in the Monthly Labor Review in March 1987.

Historic Event

The "Great Migration" of African Americans from largely rural areas of the southern United States to northern cities during and after World War I (1915-40) altered the economic, social, and political fabric of American society. More than one million black Americans left the South to seek opportunity and fuller citizenship in the North.

Local Prod

Socio-economic and political conditions in the South made African Americans likely candidates for migration. After the end of post-Civil War Reconstruction, the Nation's legislators and the Supreme Court had turned their backs on black Americans and left determination of their citizenship rights to local jurisdictions.

In the South, this abdication of authority resulted in the creation of a two-tiered system of citizenship with one set of rules for whites and a more restrictive set for African Americans. In this system of "Jim Crow" laws, black Americans, under penalty of imprisonment or possibly death, were forced to use special sections when they rode on public transportation, ate in restaurants, or attended theaters.

Southern statutes also excluded them from voting through such manipulations of the law as grandfather clauses, poll taxes, or literacy tests which prevented the majority of African Americans from voting while allowing their white counterparts access to the ballot.

Oppressive as the political situation was, the economic situation was even more oppressive in that it locked tenant farmers ("sharecroppers") into an ever-tightening cycle of debt. While the majority of black Americans in the South resided in rural areas, they did not own the land they worked. Most often they rented it from large landowners or worked as farm laborers. Bad crop years, boll weevil attacks, floods, or low crop prices often destroyed profit margins and left sharecroppers in debt to the landlord.

In order to avoid imprisonment, they agreed to work additional years in hopes of paying off their debts. Unfortunately, profits rarely were large enough to wipe out their obligations and African Americans found themselves bound to the landlord who owned their land or controlled the local store where they purchased goods on credit.

Migrating offered a chance to escape the oppressiveness of the South and begin anew.

Monday, February 10, 2014

Daily Leap Career Video of the Week: Meet Oscar Micheaux

Each week we present our Daily Leap Career Video of the Week. The video we share presents news or advice related to career development, searching for a job, the economy and employment, and other career-related topics.

In celebration of Black History Month, The Daily Leap presents a short video on the life and times of Oscar Micheaux (1884?-1951), a pioneering, entrepreneurial filmmaker whose efforts produced 40 melodramas, social dramas, gangster movies, and musicals between 1918 and 1948.

Micheaux was the one African American filmmaker who survived the competition from Hollywood and even the Great Depression, making the successful transition from silent to talking motion pictures.


Oscar Micheaux from Total Vision Media on Vimeo.

Friday, February 7, 2014

High 5 Weekly Career Transitions Roundup: Using Pinterest in Your Job Search

This is our weekly roundup of some of the best career-related articles, interviews, blogs, etc., we've read during the week. We share them so you have some great resources to prepare you for the coming week. Enjoy!

© Bellemedia | Stock Free Images & Dreamstime Stock Photos

Wednesday, February 5, 2014

The Great Migration [First Installment]

In celebration of Black History Month, The Daily Leap presents the first installation of a four-part series on The Great Migration. The series was excerpted from Spencer R. Crews' article "The Great Migration of Afro-Americans, 1915-1940," which appeared in the Monthly Labor Review in March 1987.

Historic Event

The "Great Migration" of African Americans from largely rural areas of the southern United States to northern cities during and after World War I (1915-40) altered the economic, social, and political fabric of American society. More than one million black Americans left the South to seek opportunity and fuller citizenship in the North.

The momentousness of the migration as an event does not alter the fact that the migrants were ordinary people. Like colonial settlers or western pioneers of an earlier day, these migrants were not looking to change the world, only their own status. A mixture of farmers, domestic servants, day laborers, and industrial workers, they came from all parts of the South, hoping for a chance to improve their own station or at least that of their children.

War Trigger

Without the increase in job opportunities caused by World War I, the Great Migration might never have occurred. The fighting in Europe dramatically increased the demands on companies in the United States to produce munitions and other goods to support the war effort.

At the same time, the labor pool these companies normally depended upon immigrants and native-born Americans—was dwindling. The draft siphoned off many of these men, while the turmoil in Europe disrupted the flow of immigrants from that area. Desperately in need of additional workers, northern businesses looked southward for new sources of labor.

Because African Americans made up a large portion of the unskilled workforce in the South and because of social conditions there, they became the targets of aggressive recruitment campaigns. Northern companies offered well-paying jobs, free transportation, and low-cost housing as inducements to African Americans to move North. They also sent labor recruiters into the South who received a fee for every recruit they provided for the company they represented.

Monday, February 3, 2014

Daily Leap Video of the Week: Meet Madam C. J. Walker

Each week we present our Daily Leap Career Video of the Week. The video we share presents news or advice related to career development, searching for a job, the economy and employment, and other career-related topics.

In celebration of Black History Month, The Daily Leap presents an short, animated video on the life and times of Madam C. J. Walker (1867-1919), entrepreneur of hair care products for African American women and one of the first American women millionaires. Walker used her prominent position to oppose racial discrimination, and her massive wealth to support civic, educational, and social institutions that assisted African Americans.

Click on link: Madam C. J. Walker

Friday, January 31, 2014

High 5 Weekly Career Transitions Roundup: Unorthodox Job Search Techniques

This is our weekly roundup of some of the best career-related articles, interviews, blogs, etc., we've read during the week. We share them so you have some great resources to prepare you for the coming week. Enjoy!

© Bellemedia | Stock Free Images & Dreamstime Stock Photos

5 Unorthodox Job Search Techniques You Should Try"You send out perfectly polished resumes and cover letters. Your LinkedIn profile is optimized. You’re networking and volunteering and blogging and tweeting… and still, no traction."

If you’ve been at it for a few months and aren’t getting
the results you want, it may be time to rethink your approach. It may be time to get a little weird."