Friday, March 21, 2014

High 5 Weekly Career Transitions Roundup: Dust Off Your Resume This Spring

This is our weekly roundup of some of the best career-related articles, interviews, blogs, etc., we've read during the week. We share them so you have some great resources to prepare you for the coming week. Enjoy!

© Bellemedia | Stock Free Images & Dreamstime Stock Photos

Wednesday, March 19, 2014

Green Job Series: Careers in Geothermal Energy [Third Installment]

To reach hot water far below the earth's surface, geothermal plants use wells that descend thousands of feet into underground reservoirs. Drilling these wells requires specialized machinery and workers. This installment of The Daily Leap's green job series profiles key drilling occupations in geothermal energy

Drilling Occupations

Drilling crews first drill exploratory wells to confirm the locations of underground reservoirs. After discovering the best locations, they use a derrick, a large, metal framed crane hanging over the main well, to guide drilling equipment. Because drilling equipment is so heavy, derricks are necessary to control and maneuver drilling bits, pipes, and other equipment.

Drilling fluid mixtures that help to break up the rock are pumped into the well through a pipe connected to the drill bit. The pipe also carries debris and mud out of the well and to the surface, where it can be disposed of. As the well gets deeper, new pipe sections are connected to those already in the ground, and the drill continues until it taps the underground reservoir.

Job Duties

Derrick operators control and inspect drilling derricks. These workers can raise or lower the drill bits and pipes into or out of the well. Derrick operators are also responsible for maintaining their machinery and ensuring that it operates correctly.

Rotary driller operators control the drill itself. They determine a drill's pressure and speed as it penetrates rock. To keep drill sites safe, rotary driller operators use gauges that monitor drill pump pressure and other data, such as how much drill mud and debris are being pumped from the well. Rotary drill operators also keep records of where they've drilled and how many layers of rock they've penetrated.

Roustabouts do much of the basic labor on drilling sites. They clean equipment and keep work areas free of the debris and drilling mud that the drill pipes carry up from the wells. Roustabouts also install new pipe sections that allow the drill to reach deeper underground.

In addition to the workers who drill the wells, drilling crews might include some support personnel, such as workers who transport the drilling rigs and fuel to project sites.

Education

There are few formal education requirements for drilling crew workers. Although drilling crew workers are not required to have a high school diploma, some employers might prefer to hire workers who do. While in school, drilling crew workers can learn skills such as basic mechanics, welding, and heavy equipment operations through vocational programs.

Most drilling crew workers start as helpers to experienced workers and are trained on the job. However, formal training is becoming more common as new and more advanced machinery and methods are used. Drilling crew workers usually must be at least 18 years old, be in good physical condition, and pass a drug test.

Wages

The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) does not currently have wage data specific to the geothermal industry. However, BLS does have wage data for drilling crew workers across all industries. The following table shows wages for drilling occupations in that industry group for May 2011. The wages shown are median annual wages for the United States as a whole; wages vary by employer and location.


Occupation Median annual wage
Derrick operators, oil and gas $45,220
Rotary drill operators, oil and gas $51,310
Roustabouts, oil and gas $32,980

For more detailed information on drilling occupations in the geothermal industry, click the Occupational Outlook Handbook link.

Next week's geothermal industry series installment: Construction Occupations.

Monday, March 17, 2014

Daily Leap Career Video of the Week: The Habits of Happiness

Each week we present our Daily Leap Career Video of the Week. The video we share presents news or advice related to career development, searching for a job, the economy and employment, and other career-related topics.

So what is happiness, and how can we all get some? In this video, Biochemist turned Buddhist monk Matthieu Ricard says we can train our minds in habits of well-being, to generate a true sense of serenity and fulfillment.

Click on the link to learn more:
Matthieu Ricard

Friday, March 14, 2014

High 5 Weekly Career Transitions Roundup: Battle Uncertainty

This is our weekly roundup of some of the best career-related articles, interviews, blogs, etc., we've read during the week. We share them so you have some great resources to prepare you for the coming week. Enjoy!

© Bellemedia | Stock Free Images & Dreamstime Stock Photos

Wednesday, March 12, 2014

Green Job Series: Careers in Geothermal Energy [Second Installment]

Designing geothermal plants or new drilling equipment requires the work of many engineers. This installment of The Daily Leap's green job series profiles key engineering occupations in geothermal energy.

Engineering Occupations

Most engineers work in offices, laboratories, or industrial plants, but some work outdoors at construction sites, where they monitor or direct operations or solve onsite problems.

Job Duties

Civil engineers design geothermal plants and supervise the construction phase. Many geothermal plants are built in rocky, difficult terrain, which require special procedures. Civil engineers also have to consider potential hazards such as earthquakes, and build plants to withstand them. These engineers are also responsible for designing access roads that lead to the plants.

Electrical engineers design, develop, test, and supervise the manufacture of geothermal plants' electrical components, including machinery controls, lighting and wiring, generators, communications systems, and electricity transmission systems.

Electronics engineers are responsible for systems that control plant systems or signal processes. Electrical engineers work primarily with power generation and distribution; electronics engineers develop the complex electronic systems used to operate the geothermal plant.

Environmental engineers deal with the potential environmental impacts of geothermal plants. Although geothermal energy is an environmentally friendly source of electricity, environmental engineers must consider a site's potential impact on local plants and wildlife.

Mechanical engineers research, design, develop, and test tools and a variety of machines and mechanical devices. Many of these engineers supervise the manufacturing processes of drilling equipment or various generator or turbine components.

Education

Engineers typically have at least a bachelor's degree in an engineering specialty. However, some jobs require more education, such as a master's degree or doctoral degree. Additionally, an engineer typically must be licensed as a professional engineer (PE) and is expected to complete continuing education to keep current with new technologies.

Entry-level engineers may also be hired as interns or junior team members and work under the close supervision of more senior engineers. As they gain experience and knowledge, they are assigned more difficult tasks and given greater independence.

Engineers are usually required to be certified as competent to carry out specific work, depending on the systems used by a particular geothermal power company.

Wages

The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) currently does not have wage data specific to the geothermal industry. However, BLS does have wage data for the electric power generation, transmission, and distribution industry group. The following table shows wages for engineering occupations in that industry group for May 2011. The wages shown are median annual wages for the United States as a whole; wages vary by employer and location.


Occupation Median annual wage
Civil engineers $84,950
Electrical engineers $84,730
Electronics engineers, except computer $90,790
Environmental engineers $79,530
Mechanical engineers $82,230

For more detailed information on engineering occupations in the geothermal industry, click the Occupational Outlook Handbook link.

Next week's geothermal industry series installment: Drilling Occupations.

Monday, March 10, 2014

Daily Leap Career Video of the Week: How to Make Stress Your Friend

Each week we present our Daily Leap Career Video of the Week. The video we share presents news or advice related to career development, searching for a job, the economy and employment, and other career-related topics.

In this video, Psychologist Kelly McGonigal urges us to see stress as a positive, and introduces us to an unsung mechanism for stress reduction: reaching out to others.

Learn more in the video below:


Sunday, March 9, 2014

High 5 Weekly Career Transitions Roundup: Job Search Lessons from Jimmy Fallon’s Tonight Show Debut

This is our weekly roundup of some of the best career-related articles, interviews, blogs, etc., we've read during the week. We share them so you have some great resources to prepare you for the coming week. Enjoy!

© Bellemedia | Stock Free Images & Dreamstime Stock Photos

  • 5 Job Search Lessons from Jimmy Fallon’s Tonight Show Debut"Recently Jimmy Fallon made the leap to 'The Tonight Show.' For the job seeker on a quest for their own new gig, here are some gems from Fallon’s first day on the job."

  • What HR Won’t Tell You"Human resource professionals are doing the best they can to find and hire the best candidates. What should you know when you’re looking for a job?"

  • Break Into IT with Temporary Work"The business world may be looking for technology pros, but you're not a pro (yet) if you have a new certification and no experience. How do you gain that experience?"

  • 5 Tips for Preventing Age Bias in Your Executive Resume & LinkedIn Profile"Consider these 5 ways to get a better reception from employers – and create an “age-proof” executive resume and LinkedIn Profile-–if you believe age is working against you."

  • The Era of Creative Resumes"For a resume to be effective, it needs much more than just enlisting your details, qualifications, and achievements. This should always be kept in mind when you write modern and creative resumes."